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Resources

Anti-racism is not an identity, it is an active process of identifying and eliminating racism by changing habitual mindsets, organizational structures, and structural systems. It will never feel easy, convenient, or neat. That is why we’ve curated these resources to support you on your journey to developing an anti-racism practice.

Featured Resource

How Should You Be Talking With Employees About Racism?

Leaders finding themselves in a position of addressing social unrest, should address issues openly rather than say nothing from fear of being wrong. Diversity and inclusion experts weigh in about how business leaders and managers should go about handling the issues of racism, even if they are still grappling with their own comprehension and learning journey.

For Black Professionals, Unrest Lays Bare a Balancing Act at Work

Racial tensions and protest against police brutality are raising questions for many black professionals as they weigh how much to share in professional life. Many black professionals are having to continue to show up at work and “perform as though nothing is wrong”. Yet, current events are causing stress and painful emotions while having to balance continued productivity at work.

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The 10 Commitments Companies Must Make to Advance Racial Justice

In the wake of George Floyd’s tragic death in Minneapolis, major corporations have been voicing their support for racial justice in the United States. But we are way past the point when words alone suffice. Actions are needed. Corporations can and should make 10 concrete commitments to achieving racial equity in their workplaces and society.

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What Black Americans Want Their White Friends To Know Right Now

Heightened awareness is increasing about the experiences of Black Americans in facing inequalities and systems of oppression through the history of our country. Black lives are disproportionately impacted and lost due to police brutality and the ongoing pandemic. Allies can start to show up by listening, learning, and amplifying black voices during this time. In this article, Black Americans share their exhaustion and feelings about the recent awareness and efforts to support Black lives.

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What does social unrest mean for HR leader?

Thought leader and HRE columnist Jason Averbook shares how HR should respond to the ongoing uprisings. It is important for HR leaders to make it clear they are allies. While there is no quick way to address systemic racism in the workplace, now is the time to do the work on diversity and inclusion.

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Code2040: Tech must commit to diversity and inclusion work

Tech has actively, hidden, covered up, and made excuses for the lack of effort of investing in inclusion in order to appease those who would not be in favor. In response to racial tensions and protests, the Tech industry should take actions that commit to working on racial equity in the long-term. Tech companies needs to accept that change and action needs to come from within, the must demand a shift to prioritize diversity for the entire organization, and commit to systemic change.

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Frances Frei on Leadership

What if leaders spent less time building themselves up and more time building up others? To do that, leaders must shift away from looking at themselves and, instead, empower their teams.

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This one image explains what’s happening at the anti‑racism protests

Richard Grant, an aspiring photographer, and Army veteran, captures the essence of the standoff between protesters and police. Through social media, Grant shares images to illuminate what is really happening at protests.

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How HR can bring impactful change

Experts say HR should be leading transparent discussions about racial tensions. HR leaders can’t ignore the call for organizations to address racial inequality in the workplace. When coming back to the workplace with ongoing racial justice protests HR leaders will be at the forefront of communications between an organization and its employees.

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The Fight for True Democracy

Four hundred years ago, in August 1619, a ship carrying enslaved Africans arrived in the English colony of Virginia. No aspect of the country that would be formed here has been untouched by the 250 years of slavery that followed.

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The Day‑to‑Day Work of Diversity and Inclusion

Airbnb’s head of global diversity and belonging, Dr. Melissa Thomas-Hunt, shares about how diversity efforts can do a better job of addressing the needs of black workers. While there are no quick fixes, the big wins will come from improving practices and accountability. Dr. Thomas-Hunt suggests where to start, how to get stakeholders on board, and how to make culture change start to happen.

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The Polite Language of White Supremacy

In this article, writer Yawo Brown unpacks the differences between racism and prejudice, while discussing the three ingredients that fuel passive white supremacy in our society.

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George Floyd protests: CEOs respond to national civil unrest

High-profile CEOs have made public statements to internal communications that voice solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement. Some, like Evan Spiegel of Snap, called for further actions than most like a reparations commission and radical tax changes that address social injustices against black people.

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How companies can show solidarity with employees as protests continue

Leaders should be transparent and show empathy, according to a Syracuse University professor. Companies can follow recommended steps to quickly support employees as they deal with grief of ongoing police brutality and institutionalized racism. By thoughtfully acknowledging and addressing racism issues and the impact it has on employees, organizations can boost business benefits like retention.

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We Must Talk About Racism’s Role in the Pay Gap for Moms

Institutionalized discrimination and racism have created disparities in our economic system, the pandemic has only reinforced the harm caused by these realities. Pre-pandemic, working moms have been devalued members of the workplace – something that is reflected through the gender pay gap. The mother’s pay gap is a result of a combination of factors, and each one is more insidious for women of color. Organizations must begin to recognize the places where these inequities exist within their systems and processes to work toward a more just future for everyone.

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Diversity Central: Measuring workplace diversity

Learn how to create a baseline picture that measures how your organization looks and feels before beginning diversity work and to then track the progress of your efforts. You’ll find examples of potential measurement, while they may not all be relevant to your organization or your goals, they should help guide you on what types of measurements to focus on. Some of the factors to focus on measuring your diversity program are representation among the workforce, hiring outcomes, employee development, pay equity, turnover, and marketing results.

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Microaggressions aren’t just Innocent Blunders – New Research Links Them with Racial Bias

What are the psychological impacts of everyday racism? This article by clinical psychologist, Dr. Jonathan Kanter, investigates the connection between microaggressions and racism, and their impact on the mental health in the BIPOC community.

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4 Ways To Deconstruct Systems Of Oppression

Oppressive systems are the structures within society that allow inequities to continue through policies and practices that disadvantage marginalized groups. With the greater interconnectedness society shares through social media, individuals now have greater power to create change and gain a deeper understanding of other people’s experiences.  Learn about 4 ways you can deconstruct oppression and amplify the voices of the marginalized.

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Why Inclusivity Needs to be the Backbone of Performance Reviews

Equity and advancement, especially of underrepresented people in the workplace, begins with bringing together two corporate initiatives that are often seen as separate: Diversity, equity, & belonging (DEB) and performance reviews. In order to bring rigor to these initiatives, companies can leverage an existing process of performance reviews to hold employees accountable.

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How Should You Be Talking With Employees About Racism?

Leaders finding themselves in a position of addressing social unrest, should address issues openly rather than say nothing from fear of being wrong. Diversity and inclusion experts weigh in about how business leaders and managers should go about handling the issues of racism, even if they are still grappling with their own comprehension and learning journey.

Read

Diversity wins: How Inclusion matters

The business care for inclusion and diversity is stronger than ever. Diversity wins is the third report in a McKinsey series investigating the business care for diversity and inclusion, revealing insights into how inclusion matters. While most companies have made little professes, there are still some who have proven success by adopting systematic, business-led approaches. Learn the areas your organization should take bolder action in to create an inclusive workplace.

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Meet the US Workforce of the Future: Older, more Diverse, and more Educated

An analysis of shifting workforce demographics shows that the workforce of the future will be more diverse —by gender, by ethnicity, by culture, by religion, by sexual preference and identification, and perhaps by other characteristics we don’t even know about right now. This Deloitte article is essential to understanding how to build a workforce culture that works for everyone.

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Dear White People: Here Are 10 Actions You Can Take To Promote Racial Justice In The Workplace

The most recent racial injustice reminders, such as the killings of George Floyd, was a peek into the reality that the Black community is already familiar with; many now insist the onus is on white people to actively become anti-racist in order to make a change. To be an ally focus on these actionable practices to promote racial justice publicly.

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Strategies to reflect on your HR ethics

Emerging Intelligence Columnist John Sumser is the principal analyst at HRExaminer who researches the impact of data, analytics, AI, and associated ethical issues on the workplace. Sumser nudges HR leaders to think critically through ethical questions aimed at what past data hasn’t been able to answer, about what the right thing to do is. HR leaders should use Sumser’s questions to refine their conversations surrounding DEI action and change within their organization

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How Organizations Can Support the Mental Health of Black Employees

In the wake of George Floyd’s killing, many leaders are overwhelmed and at a loss as to how to support their Black employees. Yet it’s critical that HR and DEI leaders step up to address the mental health impact on Black Americans in their workforce. Learn suggested ways to do that, including an acknowledgment of the impact of racism, providing safe places and resources to help, demonstrate support at the organizational level, and advocate for change in your community. Most importantly, listen to what your black employees are saying and advocate for the suggested changes

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Women in the Workplace

Women in the Workplace is the largest comprehensive study of the state of women in corporate America. This report explores gender representation in the corporate pipeline, the obstacles women face within the pipeline, and the unique experiences of women of all identities. Leaders should strive to understand the challenges women faces in the workplace and the different way they can help mitigate and eliminate them.

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10 Performance Review Biases and How to Avoid Them

It is not a question of if you have biases, instead, it is a question of how your biases are showing up at work. Check out this resource from Culture Amp that pinpoints how these automatic processes impact the performance review cycle and offer tactics to mitigate them.

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Racism is built into U.S. cities. Here’s how architects can fight back

Black Americans are disproportionately impacted by police brutality and the coronavirus pandemic – Architects have an opportunity to become a part of the solution to these challenges. With the duty to safeguard all communities, architects can make a difference in addressing future health crises with the key skills they bring.

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LGBTQ+ voices: Learning from lived experiences

Although diversity and inclusion work has become a higher priority among many organizations, LGBTQ+ employees continue to face challenges in the workplace. New research reveals the challenges that LGBTQ+ employees face, and ways to help them bring their authentic selves to work. Organizations can start by listening and learning about employees’ lived experiences and then following these recommended six key changes to improve workplaces for LGBTQ+ employees.

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Authenticity, self‑assessments can help address workplace bias

It is important to make an honest assessment of the current state of an organization’s journey in addressing bias and racism. A real starting point is to have business leaders and organizations weigh in as authentically as they can. While stakeholders will be watching businesses and their responses to racial inequity there is an opportunity for brands to go beyond words to make a meaningful impact.

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Sustaining and strengthening inclusion in our new remote environment

Working from home has become common for most in response to COVID-19, providing organizations the opportunity to reset team dynamics. This could become the next normal for organizations and teams to have the opportunity to introduce new, valuable habits that can create a more inclusive workplace. Now more than ever, in these times of crisis, the focus on inclusion is important because it leads to better outcomes and can support business goals. This article shared seven practices to implement that reinforce inclusion in remote workforces.

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Allyship In Action: How Managers Can Support Black Employees Right Now

Due to the persistent and traumatic nature of systemic racism, it is imperative for managers to show up and support Black employees. This resource from Paradigm IQ offers guidance and tools for leaders to learn how to lead by example and show up as an ally.

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What is a microaggression? 14 offensive phrases to avoid saying

Microaggressions are seen or experienced by a majority of American workers. With heightened awareness of racism in all facets of life, including work, it is important to understand what microaggressions are harmful and how to avoid a toxic workplace culture. Here is an opportunity to learn about some language practices that are harmful and toxic to use.

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Try These Strategies to Reduce Implicit Bias in Your Workplace

HR professionals and their organizations can mitigate the effects of implicit bias, beginning with the employer’s recruiting and hiring process and continuing through the employee’s growth within the organization. Eric Ellis,  president, and CEO of Integrity Development Corp. in Cincinnati spoke at the Society for Human Resource Management’s (SHRM’s) Talent virtual conference and shared valuable tips on mitigating bias throughout the talent lifecycle. Beginning with recognizing the need to ‘own’ your own bias and create a psychologically safe environment.

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Why job referrals can hurt a company’s diversity

“Not all referrals are equal”. Although referrals can speed up the hiring process, companies may suffer “the unintended consequences” of creating a less diverse workforce, according to a study by Payscale. Learn the pitfalls of being too dependent on employee referrals in hiring, including the result of systematic hiring discrimination against people of color.

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9 Ways to Help Black Lives Matter (BLM) and the Protesters

Mass protests against police brutality and the killing George Floyd, and many others, is drawing attention to the ongoing systemic issue of police violence. Many people may feel helpless when it comes to way to take action, but this article suggests ways you can fight against police violence, help racial justice efforts, and support the broader Black Lives Matter movement. Actions include monetary actions you can take, volunteerism, and quick ways to help like signing petitions.

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Operationalizing Racial Equity & Inclusion: Transforming Organizations and Beyond

What does it mean to use a ‘racial equity lens’ and where doI start? Check out this resource by Hafizah Omar and Nadia Owusu of Living Cities. This resource offers tactical tips for any workplace that wants to do better.

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11 Anti‑Racist Actions You Can Take at Work

Heightened awareness around the racial injustice in America has brought up how harmful structural racism is in the workplace too, a place people spend a lot of time. To be an ally to people of color at work, start with some practical actions that will create meaningful impact for your colleagues. While there is no singular way to be an ally, it is important to know this work needs to be constant and requires concerted effort to help and understand others.

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Here’s What To Do Right Now If You’re Feeling Agitated, Angry, And Afraid

It may not be the best time to make important decisions when feeling emotions of panic and fear, if you find yourself in this state you can follow these tips to gain back control and build your future. Avoiding the slippery slope of building on negative emotions is important in order to reach your goals and get through the tough times. Individuals can succeed if they change their outlook, take bold assertive actions, keep trying and don’t give up, surround yourself with supportive people and engage in aggressive positivity.

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Urgently Looking For Anti‑Racism Training for Your Company? Start Here.

When a series of traumatic and devastating news hit, the violence and police brutality faced by the Black community, the organization’s leadership felt the pressure to do something but needed guidance. A surge in demand for DEI (diversity, equity, and inclusion) education and consultancies from various organizations asking to be trained and learn how to talk about racial tensions and bias. Before responding to the crisis with a workshop, leaders should ask themselves the key questions posed here to ensure this will be a long-term, sustainable strategy that is committed to anti-racism.

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The Future of Work in Black America

Research shows that automation trends may be widening the racial wealth gap. Read about the possible interventions that may help African American workers prepare for the future. Preparing for the future will require understanding the many challenges and structures that are in place now which are impacting outcomes. This research will provide focus areas for solutions which include focusing on certain geographies to improve their economic conditions and on improving skill development and education levels in the African American community.

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Not inclusive? You’re Losing 39 Percent of Job Applicants

A recent study by McKinsey shows that LGBTQ+ and racial- or ethnic-minority candidates are more likely than others to report choosing not to pursue a job because they perceive an organization as non inclusive.

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Here’s What The Racial Wealth Gap In America Looks Like Today

The wealth gap in America has been growing since at least the 1970s and centuries of racism mean that this divide is wider for black households that are denied access to opportunities and resources available to white households. Research and statistics show the economic inequality faced by Black households, which was only reinforced by the coronavirus crisis.

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Adapt Your D&I Efforts to the Reality of the Crisis

Many companies are putting their diversity, equity, and inclusion efforts on hold during the coronavirus crisis. This is a mistake. Instead of shuttering initiatives, leaders should be focused on creating a model that is adaptable, cost-efficient, and focused on solving the problems employees experience now. To do that, they need to do three things that focus on collecting information about the current reality,  finding the right people to tackle the challenges, involve third-party help where necessary, and create a strategy at the top but empower individual managers to interpret and implement it within the context of their day-to-day work.

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How Work Stress Hits Minorities and Less Educated Workers the Hardest

Workplace stress can shave years off your life, according to a joint study by Stanford and Harvard researchers. But while these stressors, like job insecurity and high job demands, affect all American workers, they take the biggest toll on minorities and people with less education. Learn the ways race, gender, and education factors impact health outcomes linked to workplace stress in this article.

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How consumers can support black‑owned small businesses

Even in normal times, black-owned small businesses often are more vulnerable financially than others. Consumers can support Black businesses by simply shifting their shopping habits. There are several resources to know where your local Black businesses are if you don’t know any. This is the time to demonstrate support and care for the Black community and a commitment to inclusion.

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The Diversity and Inclusion Revolution: Eight Powerful Truths

​While most business leaders now believe having a diverse and inclusive culture is critical to performance, they don’t always know how to achieve that goal. Here are eight powerful truths that can help turn aspirations into reality.

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6 ways leaders can combat racism at work

CEO and founder of Supportful, Nicholas Emerson Mazzone who identifies as gay and is part Japanese, shares how he’s leading with empathy and understanding. To confront racial injustices as a standard practice leaders can apply these universal recommendations no matter the type of business. Leaders that are grappling with how to address racism can start by practicing inclusion with members of their own organization in how to address matters.

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Remote DEI Toolkit

This toolkit is for remote organizations exploring diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI). Use this toolkit to better understand the challenges of DEI in remote environments, understand what the key considerations and insight are for remote DEI, and learn about concrete strategies to try in your organization.

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4 Ways to Improve Your Company’s Disability‑Inclusion Practices

Despite articles on the advantages that people with disabilities can offer employers,  too many companies hold themselves back when it comes to hiring people with disabilities. They see hiring (some) persons with disabilities as being “the right thing to do” but do not see it as part of a talent strategy that will benefit the company and outweigh what they see as the potential expenses and risk. That mindset puts companies at a disadvantage when it comes to acquiring and leveraging the talent they need in today’s tight job market. How can a company update its thinking and strategies related to this neglected category of talent? There are four ways to make it happen.

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CEOs and Big Businesses Speak out on Racism, Police Violence

Business leaders across industries are taking actions outside of the norm to address racial injustice and discrimination including donations, dialogues among staff, and paid time off to employees to participate in protests. Now it is imperative expected by consumers and employees for brands and businesses to have a point of view on the matter.

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Leading during Trauma, Trying times, and Triggering events

Many leaders want to talk with their teams about tragic events, but don’t know how or where to start. If you feel the same way, or find yourself coaching, supporting, or working with managers or leaders who are raising the same questions, the tips for leading during trying times, trauma, and triggering events may come in handy for you .

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4 Ways You Can Tackle Racial Discrimination In Your Workplace

Oppressive systems are the structures within society that allow inequities to continue through policies and practices that disadvantage marginalized groups. With the greater interconnectedness society shares through social media, individuals now have greater power to create change and gain a deeper understanding of other people’s experiences.  Learn about 4 ways you can deconstruct oppression and amplify the voices of the marginalized.

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How To Include People with Disabilities

Several organizations have made great strides on the journey to fully include people with disabilities, developing a proven road map to RespectAbility. Inclusion will require organizations to push forward with intentionality, focus, and performance metrics. Learn research-backed practices organizations can implement that will impact culture and priorities, staffing and training, communication, and event planning. Many steps to further the inclusion of disability in DEI initiatives are quite easy to take and come without cost. All that is required is the intention to do better.

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9 Guidelines for Disability Inclusion

The Guidelines for Disability Inclusion and its resources can be used by any entity including government, private, and non-profit organizations to ensure new and existing program initiatives and policies in the areas of physical activity, nutrition, and obesity are appropriate and accessible for people with disabilities. These 9 guidelines will help your organizations check what accessibility considerations to make in any program to ensure inclusivity for people with disabilities.

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A Guide to How You can Support Marginalized Communities

Recent tragedies leave many wondering what to do to support marginalized communities in real, meaningful ways. Allyship is a constant process that means different things to different people. Explore different ways you can offer your support from steps as simple as reaching out and listening to spending time educating yourself and others.

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Bias, disrespect, and demotions: Black employees say Amazon has a race problem

Anti-Black Racism in Tech: How biased policies, practices, and behaviors discriminated against Black Amazon employees at Amazon. Interviews with diversity managers and internal data obtained by Recode indicate that Black Amazon employees are promoted less frequently and are rated more harshly than non-Black peers.

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Performative Allyship Is Deadly (And What to Do Instead)

Public social media allyship can help spur positive change but it is not enough to dismantle racism. Performative allyship involves reward for speaking out and excuses the “ally” from making sacrifices that address systemic issues. Recognizing when one is falling into the trap of performative allyship is important, the next step is to follow these suggestions geared towards advocating through action.

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75 Things White People Can Do for Racial Justice

There are many ways white people can show up as allies for Black folks. Racial justice will advance only with the support of people outside of the Black community as well. Possible actions that are recommended in this article include local government involvement, self-education, supporting and amplifying Black voices, and diversifying your own experiences and connections.

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How the LGBTQ+ community fares in the workplace

Corporate America has played an important role in the progress of LGBTQ+ rights over the past two decades, with many companies making public gestures of support. Despite various outwardly visible signs of progress, LGBTQ+ employees still face many challenges. Such challenges include lack of representation in leadership, feelings of isolation, and sexual harassment and discrimination. Companies will need to move beyond public gestures of support for LGBTQ+ efforts to create a more positive workplace that is safe and welcoming.

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Amid protests, American Brands should Behave like Activists

Companies must go beyond typical reassurances and feel-good messages surrounding racial discrimination and the criminalization of black citizens. Focus on sharing human values that help society, lean toward action, support employees, and share company perspective on moving forward. Brands have the power to influence and activate change with their stakeholders.

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How to Hold Your Company Accountable to Its Promise of Racial Justice

After the civil unrest of the spring, organizations around the country expressed their solidarity with the Black community, pledged money to fight discrimination, and promised to embrace diversity in their workforces. How can you use your influence to ensure your company follows through on its commitments? Check out this article Harvard Business Review article by Rebecca Knight to learn more.

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How to Recognize Exclusion in AI

The most critical step in creating inclusive AI is to recognize where and how bias infects the system. For AI to fulfill its promise, systems must be trustworthy – bias can tear down this trust and create real harm in large communities. Start to understand how to identify bias through inclusive design principles that can be used to identify issues early on, anticipate future problems, and guide better decision making.

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How to Speak Up If You See Bias at Work

It takes courage to be someone who speaks up to call out harmful behavior to a work environment when witnessed. Failure to acknowledge offensive conduct only helps normalize it. Unchecked bias has the potential to erode full employee participation and productivity, taking a toll on organizational effectiveness. Individuals have the power to manage how, when, and to whom to speak out to that can encourage positive change. Following these simple steps can help create more constructive and positive outcomes when speaking up.

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Leadership in This Moment: Listen Deeply, Unite Widely, Act Boldly

When employees are feeling high levels of stress and uncertainty due to the intensity of external socio-political events, great leaders can use their power to listen deeply, unite widely, and act boldly.  Based on scientific research, leaders can focus on 3 areas to make a positive change within their organization that addresses the feelings of distress that employees are experiencing.

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Survey: What Diversity and Inclusion Policies Do Employees Actually Want?

Research from BCG found that around three-quarters of employees in underrepresented groups—women, racial and ethnic minorities, and LGBTQ employees—do not feel they’ve personally benefited from their companies’ diversity and inclusion programs. There is a disconnect between leadership’s good intentions, and what DEI strategies will meet the needs of their employees. This is a great article for leaders who want to make a difference but aren’t sure how.

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Want to be Less Racist? Move to Hawaii

Where are you really from? Categorization determines how people are treated and what cultures we fit into.  Check out this opinion piece from the NYT about the culture of race in Hawaii.

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Success Comes from Affirming Your Potential

HBR research focused on African-American leaders who, despite being underestimated, underappreciated, and underresourced, have prospered and achieved incredible success. The practice of self-affirmation has broad benefits including helping people develop a healthy self-identity but also limit the detrimental effects of identity threats like negative stereotyping and overt discrimination. Draw on these affirmations developed from the research when you are finding challenges or doubts in the workplace.

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Mike Mullen: I Cannot Remain Silent

Retired admiral from the U.S. Navy and former 17th chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Mike Mullen, calls for leadership and collaboration to “address head-on the issues of police brutality and sustained injustices against the African American community”. Mullen calls attention to the implications of President Trump’s photo op at St. John’s Church, where law enforcement officers (including the National Guard) used aggressive force on peaceful protesters. Calling for leadership that unifies citizens, Mullen shares concerns about politicizing the military – especially when orders are coming from Trump.

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Why you should not bring your authentic self to work

“DEI” has become a bit of a buzzword in the corporate world. While many advocates might have good intentions, the invitation to “bring your full self to work” often doesn’t apply to people of color. Check out this TED talk by Jodi-Ann Burey, as she unmasks the challenges of being authentic in the workplace.

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A User’s Guide to White Privilege

Picking up where Peggy McKintosh’s ‘Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack’ left off, this essay explores some of the reasons that White Privilege is hard to see.

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The Costs of Code‑Switching

Behavioral adjustment in one’s style of speech, appearance, behavior, and expression to optimize the comfort of others in exchange for fair treatment or opportunities is known as “code-switching”. The cost of code-switching, a strategy long used by black people to navigate interracial interactions, includes large implications on well-being, economic advancement, and even physical survival. Research suggests it can generate both positive and negative outcomes for black employees, but does it actually improve workplace outcomes for those who do it? Learn what strategies organizations, leaders and coworkers, and black employees can take to mitigate and tackle this behavior.

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The Social Justice Conversation Is Part of Leadership

The compounding of COVID-19 and the nation’s reckoning with racial inequities calls for leaders to do the work toward social justice. Leaders can support those they lead through conversations focused in 3 key areas: treating the situation with the seriousness of the reality, understanding you won’t fully understand (but can still lead), and supporting where and how you can with your privilege.

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Strategies black employees can use to cope with trauma

The long history of African-American people being killed by police is persistent to this day. The trauma from police brutality can trigger significant effects, like symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), overtime on African-American and black employees. Being more likely to experience racial microaggressions in the workplace, this resource highlights ways to cope with trauma from these incidents.

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Native Lives Matter

In light of the debate surrounding police violence against minority populations in the United States, one group that is consistently affected, yet continuously excluded from broad public discourse, is Native Americans. Check out this great resource by the Lakota People’s Law project.

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